search account giftcard shopping-cart plus arrow-right checkmark paypal
The Unseen - An Atlas of Infrared Plates

Added to Cart

Sold by Books Marketplace

More deals you may like

The Unseen - An Atlas of Infrared Plates

Edward Thompson

Low stock
 Marketplace - Sold by Books Marketplace

$58.60

+ Delivery
Leaves warehouse in 1-2 business days
See delivery information

Qantas Points

You can earn and use Qantas Points at Kogan.com
Qantas Frequent Flyer PointsLogin or Sign up to earn an extra 29 Qantas Points on this purchase
Additional points may be earned during promotional periods. T&Cs apply.

Overview

Marketplace Listings Banner

Inspired by the scientific uses of infrared film throughout history The Unseen – An Atlas of Infrared Plates pushes the purposes and properties of the rarest photographic film on the planet to its scientific and conceptual limits. British documentary photographer, Edward Thompson, set out to explore the boundaries of perception, whether they were things outside our visual spectrum or events that went unnoticed or unreported. From researching the original Kodak advertisements, expert interviews and scientific journals, Thompson has gathered an extensive archive and used some of the last 46 dead-stock rolls of Kodak Aerochrome Infrared film in existence to reveal the unseen. The project comprises ten chapters: In The Red Forest (2012) infrared film is used to document the condition of the most radioactive forest in the world and in turn re-imagines the Ukraine in deep Soviet burgundy, something that has become eerily prophetic since 2012. In The Vein (2014) forgotten medical photography techniques are used to reveal the superficial veins beneath the skin. In The Flood (2012) one of the original purposes of the film, the documentation of crops post-flood via aerial photography, instead focuses on making portraits of families who have been affected on the ground. In The City (2014), infrared film is used to document one of the world’s most polluted cities, London. In The War (2015), the film is used to photograph military paintings, simultaneously manipulating the film’s historical military application of uncovering camouflage and also revealing hidden charcoal under-drawing. In The Village (2012) the film was used to attempt to document supernatural beings in the most haunted village in the U.K. There are no ghosts to be found. The photographs instead depict a ‘sci-fi disruption of the green and pleasant lands of the garden of England’ akin to H.G. Wells War of the Worlds. Bees and Beekeepers are documented in The Apiary (2015), Gross specimen photography in The Gross Specimen (2015) and Astrophotography in The Past (2015). The final chapter is yet to be revealed.

Create your free Kogan.com account

Create your free Kogan.com account

Already have an account? Log In

By clicking Create Account (or signing in with Facebook, Google or Paypal), you agree to the Kogan.com Terms & Conditions and to receiving marketing communications from Kogan.com. Remember, you can unsubscribe at any time.