search account giftcard shopping-cart plus arrow-right checkmark paypal
Yellow Star

Added to Cart

Sold by ShopTheGlobe

More deals you may like

Yellow Star

 Marketplace - Sold by ShopTheGlobe
This item is located outside Australia

$19.47

Free Shipping
Leaves warehouse in 2-3 weeks

Finance available

Kogan Credit CardZippayAfterpay

Overview


Marketplace Products - Kogan Guarantee

This product is shipped via the most economical route and is estimated to be delivered within 2-3 weeks of placing your order.

Starred Review Only 12 children survived the Lodz ghetto, and Roy’s aunt Syvia was one of them. But for more than 50 years, Syvia kept her experience to herself: “It was something nobody talked about.” Roy didn’t know, and she admits that she didn’t want to know. She always avoided Holocaust history. She was afraid of it; when she was growing up, there was no Holocaust curriculum, no discussion-just those images of atrocity, piles of bones, and skeletal survivors being liberated. Her father, too, was a survivor, but he seldom spoke of those years, and with his death, his story was lost. But a few years ago, Roy’s aunt began to talk about Lodz, and based on taped phone interviews, Roy wrote her story, presenting it from the first-person viewpoint of a child, Syvia, in simple, urgent free verse in the present tense. Each section begins with a brief historical introduction, and there is a detailed time line at the end of the book.

Syvia is four years old in 1939, when the Germans invade Poland and start World War II. A few months later, her family is forced into the crowded Lodz ghetto, with more than a quarter of a million other Jews. At the end of the war, when Syvia is 10, only about 800 Jews remain-only 12 of them are children. Syvia remembers daily life: yellow stars, illness, starvation, freezing cold, and brutal abuse, with puddles of red blood everywhere, and the terrifying arbitrariness of events ("like the story of a boy / who went out for bread / and was shot by a guard / who didn’t like the way the boy / looked at him"). When the soldiers first go from door to door, "ripping children from their parents’ arms" and dragging them away, her father hides her in the cemetery. For years thereafter, she’s not allowed to go outside. In 1944 the ghetto is emptied, except for a few Jews kept back to clean up, including Syvia’s father, who keeps his family with him through courage, cunning, and luck. As the Nazis face defeat, Syvia discovers a few others hidden like her, "children of the cellar." When the Russians liberate the ghetto, she hears one soldier speak Yiddish, and the family hears of the genocide, the trains that went to death camps. At last they learn of the enormity of the tragedy: neighbours, friends, and cousins-all dead. There’s much to think t and talk about as the words bring the history right into the present. Hazel Rochman
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved —This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Create your free Kogan.com account

Create your free Kogan.com account

Already have an account? Sign In

By clicking Create Account (or signing in with Facebook, Google or Paypal), you agree to the Kogan.com Terms & Conditions and Privacy Policy and to receiving marketing communications from Kogan.com. Remember, you can unsubscribe at any time.